Wednesday, January 12, 2011

TASKS GALORE!


The Task Galore books are wonderful resources for professionals and parents working with individuals with ASD. There are several different versions, not all of which are shown here. What's great about these books are the colorful photos of the tasks, which make them easy to replicate.

The authors, Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell, and Kathy Hearsey use everyday materials to teach important concepts, such as fine motor skills, math, daily living, and social skills. How materials are presented and organized is extremely important when working with individuals with ASD to ensure that we are targeting the skill we are trying to teach. When materials are falling on the floor and are not set up properly, then it's easy for the child or adult to rely on others and then we can't be sure if they understand the concept. These tasks are visual and help individuals become more independent with the skills we are trying to teach!




This book provides a number of examples of task ideas to teach fine motor skills, 
readiness concepts, language arts, math, reasoning, and play skills. Also in the book
are forms you can use to document the concepts you are teaching and tasks ideas of your own.


Photos of task ideas to teach fine motor skills

Visual examples of ways to teach math skills included in the book





This is a great book to teach "Real World" skills as suggested by the title. It provides
colored photographs of tasks to teach domestic skills, independent functioning,
vocational skills, as well as examples of job sites that actually use this type of structure


Examples of tasks that structure for grocery shopping in the
community


Visual ways to adapt common recipes included in the book











This book is an excellent resource for teachers in particular as well as parents
who are looking for ideas to plan for group activities, such as birthday parties
or other social outings. "Tasks Galore: Making Groups Meaningful" gives ideas
of how to make the physical space meaningful for individuals with ASD,  how to
use schedules to visually show what is going to happen that day, as well as ways
to present activities so the individual can see how many activities they need to do 
and in what order.



Ideas for how to structure for group activities, such as circle time



Visual ways to use "to-do lists" when planning for a party



The Task Galore books have been an invaluable resource to me as a therapist. They provide numerous examples of different activities,  but also allow for you to use your own creativity to individualize for you client, student, or child. Visuals are not only essential for individuals with ASD, but they help us all tremendously!

-Molly

5 comments:

  1. Hi Molly! I'm thinking about buying one of these books, especially because I'm nervous about keeping A. busy this summer...

    Have you seen the new Tasks Galore book about play? I saw it online in the Autism Society Bookstore, and it looked interesting, especially since that's one area that we really want to work on with him. Or do you think it would be better to start with the first book in the series, so that there's more variety? Just wondering if you had an opinion on this.

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  2. Hi Christy,
    We had the play one at our clinic but shortly after it's purchase it walked off! Can't tell you all of the specifics but is a great book for making concepts such as pretend play more concrete. We definitely think it would give you some great ideas along with the yellow original one. Anytime you can give more purpose to those abstract concepts is great. Look forward to seeing what play you all get into! Have fun!!
    Abby & Molly

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  3. That's too bad. :(

    I'm going to add both to my amazon wishlist and think about it a little more. I'm suddenly realizing that we have a long summer with a very active little boy to keep busy ahead of us!

    Thanks for the help.

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  4. Absolutely! Those books will definitely have some ideas to keep you busy :)

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  5. I really liked the book, "How do I Teach This Kid? Visual Work Tasks for Beginning Learners on the Autism Sectrum" by Kimerly A Henry

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